Keeping up the good work

Headline: I’m done with chemo

Subhead: Outlook promising,  Antibodies to continue

–———————————————-

I had another CT scan last Friday and we met with Dr. M this past Monday to get the results. M once again showed us two screen shots he’d printed out: one from my last scan in August and one from last Friday. I’m not posting the photo here because he drew on the print out and it’s hard to make out the differences. (And because I’m traveling today and forgot to take a pic of the pics.) Suffice it to say, the liver tumors shrunk even more over the past two months. My blood work is great and M was “very pleased” with the scan. This is pretty strong language from the good doctor, so we’re very pleased, too. When he left the office after our consult (in a somewhat disheveled rush, with papers akimbo, as is his way), he urged me to “keep up the good work.”

Of course, this begs the question, what comes next?

In the short term, as I’ve explained before, I’ll continue to receive Herceptin and Perjeta infusions every 3 weeks. Perhaps for the rest of my life. They also will collect blood samples during those visits, and I’ll be back to getting CT scans every 3 months.

Three is the magic number.

A quick accounting of my CT scanning experiences leads me to estimate that I’ve had around 20-25 scans since 2011. Damn. That’s a lot of radiation.

She-Hulk_new spiritsuperhero
The end result of too much radiation? Stay tuned!

Anyway, back to my update. Dr. M explained that we’ll proceed as noted above until there’s evidence of tumor growth or any other indications that the cancer is rearing its ugly, receptor-riddled head. I asked if they would return to Taxol in that situation, since I had such a good response to it. He didn’t directly answer me, but explained how pleasantly surprised the medical community has been by the THP regimen, because it’s been effective beyond their expectations.  It could be months or many years before I have any need for chemo again. And by then, who knows what the treatment options might be.

This is encouraging. But it also drove home the reality that I’m one of thousands who are still guinea pigs for this treatment.

Remember, the combination of these three drugs is still very new. It’s only been two years since the landmark Cleopatra study came out. We often hear, and sometimes have to think carefully for our own purposes, about clinical trials. But once a study has gone through phases I-IV and achieved FDA approval, we tend to think that the experiment is complete. That’s not at all the case. Although the THP treatment for HER2+ breast cancer has received all its formal approvals, every individual who uses this combo is another “n” in a longer study of the treatment’s effectiveness.*

So far, THP’s outcomes look great. Let’s hope my contribution to this experiment is on the extra long side of the “recurrence-free survival” spectrum.

Meanwhile, I have a hair update. The hair on my head is starting to fill in, though it’s still very short. My acupuncturist made a comment this week about me having thick hair.

“How do you know that??!” I asked, too quickly and with great interest.

“I can tell from how your hair is filling in,” she replied.

Hallelujah!! As you’ve likely gathered (ad nauseum), my greatest vanity in this process has been related to my hair. I’m cool with the Ripley-esque look, and have enjoyed hearing friends tell me it makes me look like a bad-ass and Husband saying it makes me look smart. (Which I don’t get, but I know he means it with love. Or maybe he’s seen too many X-Men movies.) And I’ve loved showing off my big dangly earrings. But I’ve definitely been nervous that my once thick and abundant hair would grow back thin and, well, post-menopausal. (Sigh) In short, I’m relieved to get an unbiased opinion that my hair seems to be filling in with its characteristic thickness. For that good fortune, I’m even willing to accept the uncharacteristic proportion of grays.

Another aspect of my hair has been unsettling lately, and that is the loss of facial hair. For the first four months this was great. No more post-menopausal upper lip hair to bleach, no “witch hairs” to pull, no random discoceries in the middle of an important meeting that I have a half-inch hair growing on my neck.

But over the past 3-4 weeks, I’ve been steadily losing eyebrow hairs and eyelashes. I now could count the number of individual hairs I have left around my eyes. I’ve lost all the eyelashes on the inner half of my right upper eyelid. My eyebrows consist of a few steadfast holdouts on either side, but precious few. Every time I wash my face or rub my eyes, another lash or three comes off, usually falling in my eyes and forcing me to rub my eyes furiously, causing a couple more hairs to jump ship. All I can say from this experience is that we have far more eyelashes than I would have guessed, since they fall out like maple leaves in a fall windstorm, yet I still have some left.

This facial hair loss makes me look weird. There’s no getting around it. I’ve never had big eyebrows or thick, luxurious eyelashes, but the absence of my meager allotment makes me feel naked in a way that’s hard to understand until you experience it. I’ve seen plenty of people who, for various reasons, have little or no facial hair. No problem! That’s just what they look like. It’s different to watch your own face transform in this way.

Mascara helps for the eyelashes, but I had to laugh at myself today when I realized I only had half a lid’s worth of lashes to mascarify. I’ve also taken to using eyebrow pencils. This also makes me laugh at myself, because it’s something I once thought I would never do. And it’s hard to find the right eyebrow pencil. I have two different pencils, neither of which is really quite the right shade of brown, and another powdery thing applied with a spongey brush that is a little too dark. It’s really hard to find the right approach…which leads me feeling a little self-conscious at all times. If I scratch my eyebrow, will the eyebrow come off on my finger? Or smear across my forehead? It ain’t easy.

We’ve all seen the ladies whose penciled-in eyebrows are entirely the wrong shade for their complexion, or all cockeyed, or otherwise unnerving in their precision. Hopefully none of those descriptions apply to my eyebrow drawing, but it still looks fake and, therefore, odd to see on my face. But I’m learning some grace and humility, I hope, because drawn on eyebrows are way better than five-random-hair eyebrows. Plus, I need to be able to raise my left eyebrow during conversations. It’s part of my communication tool set.

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*In scientific research, the number of individual samples you have in your study is referred to as “n,” for “number.” This applies across all fields, not just medicine. As a study’s n becomes higher, its results become more likely to be representative of real life, or what’s actually happening. Large studies of breast cancer tend to have huge n’s, in the 10s of thousands to the millions. By contrast, the largest study I could find when I was first researching uterine leiomyosarcoma had a sample size of a couple hundred people.

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Keeping up the good work

4 thoughts on “Keeping up the good work

  1. kathymenezes says:

    Yes, eyebrows ARE a part of your communication skill set. So, use those artistic fingers and keep up the wonder of a raised left eyebrow. I think they look pretty good by the way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Susan! And yes, the eyebrows! Now that my eyebrow hairs are starting to grow back (remarkably fast!) this is adding yet another layer of complexity to achieving a natural look.

      Like

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